How to Know When It’s Time to Try Again

This is something that I have been asked a few times recently. ‘How do I know when the time is right to try again?’ This is a very personal question, and the answer is going to be different for everyone. So, with this post I am going to give a very general answer based on conversations that I’ve had with various bereaved parents.

You are the only person who knows how you feel about trying again, and therefore you are the only one who knows when the time is right. However, there are some things to take into consideration.

• How does your partner feel?
• Have you had all the tests available so that you know any risks in future pregnancies?
• Are you happy with your care team?
• Are you confident that you will be well looked after?
• Do you feel ready, emotionally, for another pregnancy?
• Are you physically healed from your last pregnancy?
• Are you taking any suggested medication?

The main thing is that you, and your partner, feel ready. Rainbow pregnancies are not easy; you are no longer naïve about things that can happen, and this can be very stressful. I would urge you to work with your doctor to make sure that you are fit and healthy, and that any concerns are taken seriously; as this will help to ease your mind.

Some people feel ready immediately, others want to wait a while. What I will say (and I’m being a complete hypocrite here as I wanted to try straight away after Sophie!), is that it is best to wait for tests, especially genetic tests, to come back first; this way you can be sure that the care plan your doctor puts in place for you, is tailored to your individual needs.

I wish you the best of luck when you do decide to try again, and I’m keeping everything crossed for you!

Research into Loss

Tommy’s conduct research into miscarriage, stillbirth and premature birth; they have four research centres (London, Manchester, Edinburgh, and the National Research Centre which is the largest in Europe). Hundreds of doctors and midwives work together across the Tommy’s research centre network to improve pregnancy outcomes for both mother and baby.

There are specialist clinics within the centres for women at risk of pregnancy complications, they also have the opportunity for people to join in research trials.

London

The Tommy’s Preterm Surveillance Clinic – This is held at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ hospital, and they have been providing care for over 10 years. Tommy’s states that ‘In 2017, the total number of referrals from women at high risk of giving birth too early doubled compared to 2016. We are now seeing an average of 200 referrals each month’.

The hypertension in pregnancy clinic – This is based in St. Thomas’ Hospital and helps women with high blood pressure. They have helped 150 women since 2015.

The diabetes clinic – This is based at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Foundation Trust, the clinic helps women with diabetes, women suffering from endocrine disease and other disorders like cholestasis. ‘The research carried out in the clinic has been a driving force for the adoption of universal screening for gestational diabetes’ Tommy’s

Manchester

The Placenta Clinic – This is the UK’s first placenta clinic and was opened in 2009; they work with women whose babies have growth restriction, and study the placenta carefully to reduce the risk of stillbirth.

The Rainbow Clinic – This is based at St. Mary’s and they provide care to women who have suffered a previous stillbirth or neonatal death.

The Lupus in Pregnancy Clinic –Tommy’s is supporting this clinic which helps women with the autoimmune disorder Systemic Lupus Erythematous and related diseases. Tommy’s supports the clinic through access to our research midwives.

The Manchester Antenatal Vascular Service – This is based at St. Mary’s hospital in Manchester, and offers extra monitoring and pregnancy care to women with a history of high blood pressure, and those at risk of related complications. Tommy’s states that ‘MAViS is currently home to exciting research funded by the National Institute for Health Research’. Tommy’s supports the clinic through access to our research midwives.

Edinburgh

Tommy’s Metabolic Antenatal Clinic – This clinic helps women with severe obesity, they have specialists in pregnancy care and diabetes, as well as midwives and a specialist dietician. 25-30 women each week are seen in this clinic. Last year women attending this clinic were 8 times less likely to have a stillbirth than women attending clinics not specialised in helping obese women.

Tommy’s Lothian Preterm Birth Clinic – This clinic aims to continue reducing preterm birth and late miscarriage rates, to improve the quality of care for women and to develop expertise in managing complex cases.

Miscarriage centre clinics

Tommy’s National Centre for Miscarriage Research has recurrent miscarriage clinics in three different sites in the UK. All of these offer close monitoring and care during the early stages of pregnancy to women who have previously suffered miscarriages. They are also able to take part in Tommy’s clinical trials, which hope to provide women with reasons for their loss. The clinics are based in:
• Birmingham Women’s Hospital
• University Hospital Coventry
• St. Mary’s Hospital London

If you would like to be referred for one of these clinics, then please visit: https://www.tommys.org/our-organisation/help-and-support/clinical-trials

If you would like to take part in one of the trials, then please visit: https://www.tommys.org/our-organisation/help-and-support/i-would-take-part-tommys-trial

To sign a petition I made to cut the stillbirth rate in the UK, please visit: https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/cut-stillbirth-rates-by-half